The four steps to creating compelling life science case studies

Case studies can be tough to create because there’s a lot that can go wrong. In this final issue covering case studies, I break the larger challenge into four simpler steps. I’ll give you guidance on how many case studies you need, how to collect content for your case studies and—most important—how to separate the task of organizing your case study from writing the final language, so that you can structure it in the most compelling way possible

By |Story, Thought leadership|

The 8 fundamental principles behind the creation of compelling case studies

I’ve spent the last several issues dissecting the topic of case studies, looking at all the components that make them compelling. When I began the topic, I had no idea it would require such a deep dive. Now that we’re close to the finish line, it’s time to put all these pieces back together. I’ll walk you through the steps to creating a compelling case study—one that allows your prospects to see themselves in the story; one that allows your unique value to come shining through.

By |Story, Thought leadership|

Storytelling, A-B-T, and compelling case studies

Creating compelling case studies can be straightforward, if you follow the And-But-Therefore (A-B-T) template that I introduced in the last issue. Scientists are very familiar with using peer-reviewed papers to communicate, but these papers are written to prioritize accuracy over engagement, so peer-reviewed papers make a very poor template for use in our case studies. Because scientists are not used to writing for engagement, the A-B-T template is very useful when creating marketing messages or effective case studies. In this issue I examine the five key questions and the one crucial constraint that must be addressed when using the A-B-T template.

By |Story, Thought leadership|